Tag: Tennessee

Just Stories, Part 4

Isshin-ryu Karate … JD Cordell style!

My involvement with the martial arts …

I have had a long-held interest in the martial arts. One Christmas, I received a book called Best Karate, written by Mas Oyama, when I was 13 or 14 years old. I spent hours in my bedroom trying to learn from the book.

When I began attending the Charles H McCann Technical School in North Adams, Massachusetts, I was invited by a friend to a Uechi-ryu Karate (a very traditional Okinawan system) class in nearby Adams and started attending. But once I discovered cars and girls, that pretty much ended that … as well as my interest in scouting.

When I was stationed in Korea (12/81 to 12/82), I studied Tae Kwon Do with the battalion instructor. He was excellent. I earned a red belt, which, in that system, was the equivalent of a brown belt in the ranking system used by many styles. When I got back to the U.S., I started competing in tournaments and did okay. However, I discovered these Isshin-ryu guys who had a wicked reverse punch. They would slide up your extended kicking leg and nail you with it. I decided I needed to see what they were doing and so sought out an Isshin-ryu dojo.

Years later, I was running my own dojo and hosting tournaments. But I was very disappointed in the way things were evolving. I was never that wild about sport karate. I just did that to keep students. I saw limited techniques being used in sport karate; it was more like a game of tag. The rules seemed to violate the karate “maxims” I was trying to adhere to.

For example, in Okinawan Karate, all kicks are targeted below the waist. Step into the ring, and now all kicks must be above the waist. That seemed odd!

And kata, especially with the advent of musical kata, quickly devolved into breakdancing with some kicks thrown in.

Note: Let me just say that full-contact karate and MMA fighters of today are great athletes and some damn tough individuals. They are very good at what they do and deserve respect. It is just not “karate” as I had come to understand it.

The problem was that I do read a great deal, and I had read a lot of history about Okinawa, the birthplace of Karate, and the early pioneers of Tang Hand, which later become known as Empty Hand … or Karate. I was simply not seeing the Karate I’d read so much about. Either the stories were all lies, or there was nobody around who could do that stuff anymore. I was actually ready to throw in the towel. Then I met Sensei Sherman Harrill.

Sensei Harrill was from a cross-roads in the cornfields called Carson, Iowa (near Council Bluffs). He was an ex-Marine who trained with the Isshin-ryu system’s founder, Tatsuo Shimabuku, while stationed in Okinawa in the late 50s. And he was the real deal.

Everything I had ever seen paled when stacked up against what he did. No matter who you were, how big, how strong, or what you knew … he would effortlessly show you the error of your ways. Organizations, rank, who you knew did not matter. It was what you could demonstrate on the mat that counted.

So, I started over. I traveled all around the country to seminars for years to train with this guy. It was a humbling and memorable moment when I asked him how I could become his student. He laughed and replied. “well, most folks just ask.” So, I asked. And he replied, “Darren, I have seen the changes you are making in your Karate and how you train … so welcome aboard.”

That was the beginning of the journey of a lifetime.

The origins of JD’s Nguyen-ryu

Nguyen-ryu is an indigenous martial art found in Vietnam. Mai’s father, Ang, was a village elder, and in the book Serpents Underfoot, a well-respected practitioner of this art. Ang taught this art to both his daughter, Mai, and the son of his old Montagnard friend, Dish. Dish and Mai both taught the art to Curtis Cordell, Mai’s American husband, and JD’s father.

Curtis tried to teach Nguyen-ryu to his son, but that old father-son thing interfered. Eventually, Curtis took his son to a dojo run by a friend of his. That Sensei taught a very traditional version of Isshin-ryu. JD did learn a great deal of Nguyen-ryu from his mother, which blended well with the Isshin-ryu.

It has been my experience that most “real” martial arts have more in common than differences. That is because when you get past all the marketing hype, it is body mechanics that determine what works … and the human body only moves powerfully so many ways.

My exposure to Nguyen-ryu

Enter Charlie Taylor, a good friend, a Vietnam veteran, and a damn good martial artist. He just showed up at my dojo one day and started helping out.

Charlie had served several tours in Vietnam as a medic on Long Range Reconnaissance Patrols in the region of Vietnam my books focus on. He was a quiet guy, but when the mood struck, he had some fantastic stories to tell about his experiences in Vietnam. I am sure he embellished them a bit to make them more fun to listen too, but there was something in the stories and his eyes when he told them that led you to understand that there was an element of truth to each one.

Charlie was also a highly-skilled martial artist, and there was nothing “superfluous” in what he did. I remember spending time training what was essentially a “silent sentry removal” technique with him and being shocked and a bit disturbed at the ease with which it worked. I still remember asking him, rhetorically,

“And, you’ve used this before.”

He just looked at me kind of funny and replied, “On a few occasions.”

While he knew a few of the kata, Charlie didn’t practice Isshin -ryu. In fact, many of our workouts consisted of me teaching him more Isshin-ryu kata. He practiced what he called Nguyen-ryu. Charlie claimed he’d learned it from his grandfather, who’d married a Vietnamese girl while stationed in Japan after WWII. This girl’s father was a skilled practitioner of the style, and after a suitable period of denials, consented to teach it to his daughter’s round-eyed husband.

I know it sounds like a movie plot. And maybe it is. I can neither prove nor disprove Charlie’s claims. However, I can definitely vouch for his abilities. Charlie could be damn scary when he was “in the zone,” much like my former instructor, Sensei Harrill. Those who have trained with Sensei Harrill will understand what I am referring to. We called it “shark eyes.”

Charlie breaking three boards (no spacers) with a ridge-hand at a demo in Norris, TN.

Charlie did have an honorary 5th-degree black belt in Isshin-ryu Karate signed by Harold Long. However, he always claimed it was not worth the paper it was written on. It seems Charlie had impressed Harold Long with his abilities while training for a period at Long’s school in Knoxville, Tennessee, but, as mentioned earlier, had only learned a few of the kata. He held no official rank in Nguyen-ryu, so he always wore a white belt.

I will say that the kid’s classes loved it when Charlie regaled them with stories of his early training days. He always referred to them as “Papaw Days.”

Unfortunately, Charlie passed away a few years ago from a combination of medical conditions, several of which I am sure originated with his tours of duty in Vietnam. Some of the threads in Serpents Underfoot and Montagnard are based on past discussions with Charlie. And I think Charlie may be resurrected from the dead for a character in the next book in the series titled Reciprocity. I think he would like that.

Martial Arts scenes in the two books …

I have seen a large man knocked unconscious with a punch to the shoulder. I do not know too many people who could do that. Sensei Harrill certainly could. And, his “fence post punch” was something to behold. You did not want to get hit with it.

On more than one occasion, MMA fighters or cage fighters from the casinos in Council Bluff would make their way to his dojo after hearing about this karate guy who had a reputation for being a badass. Every one of them left with a new appreciation for karate … well, at least Sherman Harrill’s version.

The technique JD uses to take out the drug smuggler on the trail from Laos into Vietnam is simply one of my variations on Charlie Taylor’s sentry removal technique.

Putting it all together

I like to think my stories are written to entertain, but there is so much more to them, at least for me. They are ways to remember, record, and share the people I have known, places I have been, things I have seen, and the stories I have heard, as well as the possibilities those things can combine to create.

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Tunes for Tuesday: Blues Deluxe

Joe Bonamassa is probably the most gifted guitarist I have ever seen and listened to in my life. I saw him play in Knoxville, Tennessee and was utterly blown away. It was about a three-hour set. In the middle, the band went off stage for a break. Bonamassa just grabbed an acoustic guitar and continued to amaze the audience. I have never before or since heard anyone play an acoustic guitar the way he did.

Mountain Time (Live From The Royal Albert Hall, 2019)

Now that is a grand performance.

Blues Deluxe (2007)

While a blues guitarist, Joe Bonamassa also covers some really great rock as well. However, Led Zeppelin, despite their moniker as the founders of Heavy Metal, was essentially a blues-based band. Here Bonamassa performs one of my all-time favorite blues songs by Zeppelin.

I Can’t Quit You Baby (KTBA Cruise 2019)

Your really need to watch this video to the end. It is freaking amazing! A great showcase of both Joe Bonamassa and Jimmy Page’s guitar virtuosity.

For those of you who, like me, love to take the guitar ride, here is an awesome guitar duel between Joe Bonamassa, Tommy Emanuel, and Josh Smith. Check this shit out!

I will just end this post here … with this great video, Remembering BB King, that Joe Bonamassa did for his mentor and friend, BB King.

If you enjoyed this Tunes for Tuesday post, please take a few minutes and check out some of my other blog posts by clicking here!

And, if you happen to love reading great action-adventure stories, check out my award-winning novel, Montagnard.

Survived my first official Book Signing!

And … a great time was had at the book signing!

Book Signing

My first Official Book Signing!

Tuesday, February 27th, I arrived at McKay’s Used Books and CD’s in Knoxville, Tennessee to set up for my first “commercial” book signing for Serpents Underfoot. The book signing was scheduled from 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM. It was a bit intimidating.  I mean, what if nobody buys a book? How silly would I feel then? Anyway, I got set up and waited. My daughter-in-law Leah, a great photographer, came by to take s few pictures for me. That was very kind of her, and she also did a great job!

The First Hour

The first hour went pretty slow. A few people looked as they passed by, but nobody stopped. I started to wonder if my initial worries might come true. Leah and I chatted about odds and ends, but book sales-wise, it was looking pretty grim. We noticed a military service member come in. He did stop by, and we chatted a bit. He was a Captain in the U.S. Army. I had served in the Army from ’79 to ’83, so we discussed Army life for a bit. I ended up giving him a book and signing it for him to thank him for his service. I figured, at least I could give one book away!

The Second Two Hours

Book SigningHowever, I think giving the book away started something!  A few minutes later I had sold a few books. People were stopping by and asking questions about the book, me, how long I’d been writing, etc. It was fun at that point. Then Brad Walker stopped by and chatted a few minutes. Brad is an Isshin-ryu colleague of mine and also sells real estate in Knoxville with Keller Williams. As time went on, I sold more books. All-in-all it was a great experience and a lot of fun. I am looking forward to doing more. I guess I will start in the Cary area, then maybe Charlotte and Asheville!

If I Missed You at the Book signing

Serpents Underfoot is available at several online booksellers: Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble, and Books-A-Million. Anyone interested in acquiring a signed copy can always reach me through my website. I am willing to ship the book about anywhere. I have shipped one copy to the UK so far.

I am also working on the sequel, Montagnard, and will be posting excerpts in the not too distant future.

Onwards and upwards!

Book Signing

One More Thought!

If you have purchased a copy of my book, Serpents Underfoot, I want to express my sincere appreciation for your support!  If you read my book and you enjoyed it, please take the time to give it a review on whichever website you happened to purchase it from. Reviews are a big help to authors … especially good ones!

East Tennessee Patriot Riders Mission

I always get such a good feeling in my heart from participating in these special events.  It is really quite an honor and the gratitude of the family is often overwhelming.

This time it was a priviledge to stand in honor of  another of Tennessee’s Heros.  Virgil Shelton, of Clinton , Tennessee , died on Monday, August 10, 2009 at his home.  Mr. Shelton proudly served in the United States Army from September 14, 1965 to August 30, 1967.    He served with the 7th Calvary,  Armored Division,  Troop C.  

Mr. Shelton was also an avid motorcycle rider.

 East Tennessee Patriot Riders

Thank you, Mr. Virgil Shelton, for your service to our country.  You have our gratitude and our respect.

U.S. Rep. Zach Wamp takes aim at Obama

U.S Rep. Zach Wamp, who is seeking the GOP nomination for governor in 2010, spoke at a town hall meeting held at Gunny’s Indoor Shooting Range in Maryville.  The town hall meeting was sponsored by a local Knoxville radio station.  Flanked by Phil Williams (of Knoxville News Talk Radio) and David “Gunny” Perry (owner of Gunny’s Indoor Shooting Range), Wamp told the crowd who had gathered for the meeting that if President Obama ever issued an executive order “taking up guns” that, as governor, “We will meet him at the state line.”

All I can say to that is HOOYAH! 

Now …. I may not agree with Zach Wamp on every issue, but … if he means what he says when it comes to supporting honest, law-abiding Tennessean’s Second Amendment Rights against the soon to be renewed attacks by the most conniving, anti-gun administration the U.S. has ever seen … then he will probably get  my vote as governor in 2010.  Unless … of course  … he screws up!

Support Mark Devol for Congress in 2010

I have known Mark Devol and his wife, Becky, for many years.  I taught their two girls karate for several years when they were younger.  Mark and Becky DeVol are both solid conservative Americans!  Mark is running for Congress in 2010 in the Third District of Tennessee.

Mark is a millwright and runs his own company, Devol Millwork.  He has, on occasion, employed some of the young men who passed through my dojo.  Becky is the treasurer for the Andersonville Volunteer Fire Department and home schooled their two daughters … who are now both junior volunteer firefighters.

Here are some of the positons Mark DeVol takes on his campaign website:

Government Reform

Mark supports Congressional Term Limits.  He supports reducing the size of the federal governmen, and generating  federal revenue through a Fair Tax.

Mark supports the creation of a 10th Amendment Commission to review the constitutionality of all federal agencies and programs under Section 8, and … returning the powers and responsibilities left to the states back to the states.  

He also supports the bill sponsored by John Shadeeg of Arizona that states that all bills introduced in the U.S. Congress must include a statement setting forth the specific constitutional authority under which the proposed law is being enacted.  Such a measure would force a continual re-examination of the role of the federal government and would certainly go along ways toward curtailing the evermore intrusive reach of the federal government.

Under Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution, Congress has the power to do 18 specific things.  They are:

  • To lay and collect Taxes
  • To borrow Money
  • To regulate Commerce
  • To establish a uniform Rule of Naturalization
  • To establish uniform Laws of Bankruptcies
  • To coin Money
  • To establish Post Offices
  • To promote the progress of Science and useful Arts
  • To establish a Courts system inferior to the Supreme Court
  • To declare War
  • To provide and  maintain a Military
  • To make all Laws necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers

Mark believes the federal government should stick to doing just that.  

For my part, I find that I strongly agree with his position …

Homeland Security

Mark believes that the primary function of the federal government is to protect its citizens by providing for a strong national defense  

…. I absolutely agree!

Immigration

Congress is charged with the responcibility of securing the borders of this country and  Mark DeVol thinks they should do just that.  

I agree but would also like to see that tied to no amnesty for illegal immigrants … and temporary worker permits for honest migrant workers!

Energy

Mark supports energy independence and achieving this by increasing nuclear energy production, oil production and building modern oil refineries while our scientists work to continue developing alternative energy sources.  

Makes sense to me ….

Budget and the Economy

Mark supports a budget balanced by utilizing fiscally conservative principles, lowering taxes, and letting the American people decide where to spend their money  ….  Can I get an Amen!

Education

According to Mark, our education system must be able to meet the demands of a rapiding growing and prosprous economy.  He says that the fundamental concepts of  personal finance, basic economics, personal responsibility, and self-governence must be taught … all students must be given the right tools to succeed!  

 … sounds much better than teaching them to put condoms on a banana or that God is a myth to me!

Mark also supports increased salary and bonus for effective teachers and Tort reform  

Health Care

Mark points to Cover TN as a good  example of what works in health care.  He supports making all medical expenses tax exempt, allowing the purchase of health insurance on the free market, eliminating state mandates and allow purchasing of catastrophic insurance, allowing medicare patients to utilize their health savings accounts and to have optional coverage, and Tort reform

….  again, this just make too much sense!  But there is always someone one looking for handouts!

Social Security  

Mark wants to protect citizens who have paid into and rely on social security.  According to Mark, future generations should be educated to develop the financial skills and discipline to fund their own retirement

… can I please get another Amen!

I like it!  No political double talk … just sound American Principles and Values being reintroduced and put back to work!  

These are the very same Values and Principles that originally made this Country great … and that the enlightened progressive  left-wing liberals (or whatever you want to call them) have tried so hard to stamp out … rugged individuality, personal responsibility, freedom of opportunity, and the true American liberty to succeed …  or fail … with the freedom to try again!  

For more information about Mark Devol and his campaign, please visit his website at www.devol2010.com