Tag: Must reads

New Book Review Page

I have done a significant number of book reviews over the years, and it dawned on me that they become too easily lost among the other blog post in a typical blog feed.

Therefore, I created a new book review page called DC’s Book Reviews and will display images of the books I have reviewed on the page. Each image will contain a link to that book review in my blog. I have been working on this for several days, and it is now ready to go live.

Voilà! A lot less searching.

I guess I’ve done about 40 or so book reviews. However, 16 have been added to date. I will keep working at this until all of them are on the book review page.

I do enjoy good books and reviewing them for other readers. However, lately, whenever possible. I have turned to audiobooks. I guess my eyes are getting a bit older, and too many years of working at the computer have taken its toll. Audiobooks are a great way to enjoy books, even with tired eyes!

While I only review books I have an interest in reading, anyone interested in having an honest book review done by me can contact me through my contact form. I will reply as quickly as I can.

Click here to view my new book review page. It is also a menu option a the top of the page.

Also, please check out Serpents Underfoot and Adirondack Bear Tales available on Amazon.com. Montagnard is now in the hands of my editor and will be released later this summer.

Thanks for stopping by!

Diet Eman- WWII Hero posted on History of Sorts

There are so many brave souls you never read about in the history books. I enjoy a lot of the stories Dirk DeKlein post on his blog History of Sorts. Dirk is a Dutch man living in Ireland and he is passionate about music, movies, and history. His posts primarily concern the WWII era, but often include music, movies, and the occasional serial killer.

This story is about a young Christian couple engaged to be married, who join the Dutch resistance and help fight the Nazis. Both are eventually captured. While Diet finally gains her freedom and moves to the U.S., her fiance died in Dachau Concentration Camp. Diet also had a brother die in a Japanese prison camp.

Diet Eman eventually wrote her memoir with help from Dr. Jame Schaap. titled Things We Couldn’t Say. It is a dramatic account of Christian resistance in Holland during WWII. It has been added to my “Must Read” list and I just had to mention it here. Click the link below to read Dirk’s entire post.

Only the good die young, all the evil seem to live forever is a line from an Iron Maiden song, and there have been times where I thought this to be true, because I saw so many evil people living a long and prosperous lives. But thankfully ever now and then that theory is proven […]

Diet Eman- WWII Hero. — History of Sorts

Suggested Readings (Tongue in Cheek)

Do you have enough material for your winter reading list?

funny bone

A friend of mine posted these selections. A few of them looked pretty interesting, so I thought I would share them here.

  • How to Write Big Books by Warren Peace
  • The Lion Attacked by Claude Yarmoff
  • The Art of Archery by Beau N. Arrow
  • Songs for Children by Barbara Blacksheep
  • Irish Heart Surgery by Angie O’PLasty
  • Desert Crossing by I. Rhoda Camel
  • School Truancy by Marcus Absent
  • I Was a Cloakroom Attendant by Mahatma Coate
  • I Lost My Balance by Eileen Dover and Phil Down
  • Positive Reinforcement by Wade Ago
  • Shhh! by Danielle Soloud
  • The Philippine Post Office by Imelda Letter
  • Stop Arguing by Xavier Breath
  • Spots on the Wall by Hu Phlong Poo
  • Yellow River by I.P. Freely
  • Under the Bleachers by C. Moor Butts
  • 50 Yards to the Outhouse by Willie Makit and Betty Wont

Reading is fundamental … but humor is good for the soul!

On another note, Serpents Underfoot is now available on Audible.com. I hope you will take a minute to check it out!

Book Review: The Last Battle by Stephen Harding

The war is over …

The Last Battle

It is May, 1945. Adolf Hitler lies dead and burned  in his bunker. The Third Reich is now little more than a smoking pile of rubble. American soldiers think about going home, now that the war is essentially over. Formal surrender is just days away.  Then something unbelievable happens. The  Last Battle is still yet to be fought.

The last battle begins …

According to John C. Lee, Jr, “Well, it was just the damnedest thing!”

Captain John C Lee, Jr. is in command of a small group of American soldiers, disheartened Wehrmacht soldiers and one ex SS officer. A startling  alliance forms to protect a group of VIP French prisoners from being executed at the end of WWII.

The stage is set …

German forces invade France in May of 1940.  Hitler’s troops round-up many French government officials and other VIPs, including   Wimbledon champion. Initially, these prisoners spend time in places like Dachau, Buchenwald and Sachsenhausen. Hitler decides to have some hostages on hand to exchange if things go bad.

As a result, this group of illustrious prisoners find themselves interred at Schloss Itter, a castle in northern Austria. The living conditions at Schloss Itter are much better than at the concentration camps.  However, the French prisoners were not out of the woods.  The commandant of the castle is a brutal, murderous thug who, at one time, was in charge of prisoner discipline at Dachau.

The German army is in compete disarray after Hitler’s death. Deserters are very common. A fanatical unit of SS troops receives orders to execute the French VIP’s before they can be rescued. The SS set out to carry out their last orders.

An unbelievable tale …

The Last Battle tells the unbelievable story of this unlikeliest battle of WW II.  This small group of American tankers, led by Captain Lee, who with the help of German soldiers, fight off these fanatical SS troops and protect the stronghold’s VIP prisoners. This is a tale of unlikely allies, real bravery and desperate combat between soldiers who just want to go home alive and fanatical Nazi killers.

While this is a great story., it is not a bang, bang, shoot-em-up!  It is a history and well-documented.  The story does start a little slow because of the great attention to detail. Beginning chapters contain biographies of the French prisoners and there is a great deal of historical background.  The battle comes at the end.

I did thoroughly enjoy the read and if you are a historian, you should enjoy it as well.  If you need not stop action … this might not be a book for you.  It is an fascinating and excellent story. I give it 4 Stars!