Tag: grandfathers

A Bit More Grandfatherly Wisdom and the American Flag

Measure twice, cut once!

We’ve all heard that saying, I guess. While it is clearly a carpenter’s saying, advising that you measure the board twice before you make the cut to eliminate mistakes and waste, it can apply to many situations in our lives.

My Grandfather Klippel had his own unique spin on many of these old bits of wisdom. His version was …

“I sawed it off twice, and it’s still to short!”

Raquette Lake, NY

When you visit Raquette Lake in the Adirondack Park, you drive along Route 28 and pass through Burke Town. Don’t blink, because you will miss it. It consists of Burke’s Marina, a few rental cabins, a restaurant across the road which is no longer open, and three dirt roads on your left if you are headed towards Montreal. Raquette Lake will be on your right.

If you turn up the first dirt road, you will find camps along both sides of the road. In the south, they call them cabins. In the Adirondacks, they are camps. Most of these were initially built by employees of Remington Arms as vacation homes and were quite small and rustic.

Some have been turned into homes now, and most have changed hands with the original owners dying off and families selling them off. There’s quite a waiting list to get these camps. Both of my Grandfathers were Remington Arms employees who bought lots and built camps. My parents bought a lot when I was just a year or two old. We tented on our lot for many years before starting our camp.

L to R, Grandpa Klippel, Grandpa Gilbert, Curt Gilbert (my father) pouring concrete footers for the camp piers.

Grandpa Klippel is the “grandfather” featured in the true story Adirondack Bear Tale #3: A Trip to the Dump.

Grandpa Gilbert plays a part in the tale Adirondack Bear Take #8: Campfire BBQ Chicken.

We still have our camp, and I try to get up to the Adirondacks every summer, but sometimes life does get in the way. One trip Sophie and I made a short time ago was the basis for Adirondack Bear Tale #11: Sophie and the Three Bears.

And these stories, along with other true tales, are featured in my little book, Adirondack Bear Tales, available on Amazon.com.

In fact, the picture below was taken the evening after our “bear interrupted” hike to the old ski slope!

Sophie resting after saving me from the mamma bear and her three cubs!

Back to the Grandfather thing …

All this is kind of a set up for one of my favorite memories of my Grandfather Klippel. When I was perhaps 8 or 10-years-old, I wanted to put a flagpole on our lot, so we could fly the American flag over it when we were there.

I was telling my Grandfather about this, and he figured that it should be no problem at all. He took me out, and we found a tall White Pine tree on the back of their lot. They had to be thinned out occasionally anyway, because they grew so high, and would blow over in the winter, sometimes causing a lot of damage.

My Grandfather had me cut it down, and trim off all the branches. Then he provided me with a draw knife with which to peel the bark off the trunk. If you have never seen a draw knife, I have included a picture here.

Draw Knife

Peeling that bark off was a lot of hard work, but with his encouragement, I stuck it out. Once the trunk was clean, he had me coat the butt end, which would be buried in the ground, heavily with some kind of wood preservative. Then it was off to the Raquette Lake General Supply Store for a pulley, a rope, and a dock cleat to use as a tie-down.

Boat Cleat

It was a proud day in my life when my Grandfather helped me set that flagpole. Of course, it has long since rotted away. That was many years ago. However, we flew the American flag from that flag pole for many years while camping on our lot at Raquette Lake.

Raquette Lake Supply Company – General Store

I hope you will check out some of my other posts by clicking here!

The Wisdom of Grandfathers

Something that I think we are in danger of losing as our society turns more toward social media and texting for communication is talking to and gaining wisdom from those who came before us.

Erwin Klippel

My Grandfather Klippel was a pretty handy guy. He worked for Remington Arms in Ilion, NY, as a gun assembler, and if memory servers me correctly, he built the prototype for the Remington Model 1100 12-gauge semi-automatic shotgun.

As a young man, he’d gone out west to study to be an airplane engine mechanic, but unfortunately, had to give that up to come home and help on his family’s farm. But he could build a camp, drive a truck, pour concrete, raise chickens, or tell you where to dig your well. And he had an endless supply of witty, often whimsical comments and stories to tell.

He played semi-pro football, and I understand he was also quite a dancer and rode an old Indian motorcycle around, at least until he met my Grandmother. He also taught me how to split wood with an ax, which incidentally helped me to embarrass a lot of bigger and stronger guys when it came to ringing the bell with a big hammer at state fairs. Looking back, I am glad they didn’t get too upset by that!

But, most importantly, he had a lot of wisdom and was always willing to share.

Never a borrower be, but …

One of my favorite stories my mother shared with me about her father involves a rusty old saw.

When my mother was a little girl, she was helping my Grandfather repair one of the chicken coops in the back yard. He needed some sort of saw that he did not have. He hated to borrow things but had little choice, so he went to a neighbor and asked to borrow that particular kind of saw.

His neighbor was kind enough to loan him the use of the saw, but the saw was in terrible shape. It was dull, the blade was rusted and pitted, and the handle was loose. My Grandfather made the saw work, and when he was done, he took it into his workshop and began to work on the saw. With my mother watching, he cleaned and polished the blade, sharpened it, and repaired the loose handle.

My mother asked him why he was doing all that. She could not understand why he would spend the time fixing a saw he had borrowed. Clearly, she said, the saw’s owner wasn’t concerned about it.

My Grandfather turned to her and said, “Ardis, always return something in better shape than when you borrowed it. Doing that can only serve you well in life.”

That bit of wisdom had a big impact on my mother, and later, also on me.

We need more people today to think like that!

I hope you will check out some of my other posts by clicking here!

Success Secrets: Measure Twice, Cut Once

I’ve sawed it off twice and it’s still to short!

Wisdom is a key to success.

Where do we find the wisdom to achieve success? For me, one source was listening to the wisdom of my elders.

I spent many wonderful hours as a child with my grandparents. During those times I learned many valuable life lessons, tidbits of wisdom, and humorous stories. My grandfathers were very different, but each had a great deal to offer their grandsons. This should certainly not be taken as to make light of the influences my grandmothers had on me as well. They were both incredible women who worked very hard and sacrificed so much to get their families through a very tough period in our country’s history. Their influences were very strong as well. However, this particular post is about one lesson from one grandfather.

The experiences of my grandparents, growing up and raising families during the Great Depression and World War II gave them a unique view of the world. They had a real down to earth wisdom that seems to be so often lacking today. It saddens me sometimes to see intelligent people make serious miscalculations because they simply don’t take the time to look twice.

I remember working on a project with my grandfather that involved cutting 2 x 12’s for floor joists. My grandfather was supervising my work. We were in the early stage of building our family camp in the Adirondacks. My grandfather had a lot of practical life experience in building projects, and had also built their camp down the road. He was a jack-of-all-trades kind of man.

Measure twice, cut once …

The actual circumstances are a bit fuzzy. This was many years ago. But, I remember that I had just cut a 2 x 12 to fit as the next floor joist to be put in place. Unfortunately, I had cut too short. So short, in fact, that it could not be used and the 2 x 12 had to be discarded. If you have been involved in any building projects, you just might know how expensive 2 x 12’s are.  I don’t remember my Dad saying anything, but that meant another trip to the lumber yard for one more 2 x 12. My hope is that we were able to use the “now too short” 2 x 12 some where else in constructing the camp. I am sure we did, but really don’t remember. It would have been pretty expensive to use it as firewood!

Surprisingly, I was allowed to continue in my “saw man” job. Maybe they figured I “needed to get back up on that horse that had thrown me.” As I picked up the tape measure to cut another 2 x 12, my grandfather quietly commented, “Measure twice, cut once.” I followed that advice and the next joist fit perfectly … success!

I know this phrase did not originate with him, but it was the first time I had heard it. It stuck with me my entire life.

Save your self some grief.

successSo, the next time you are tackling some kind of a problem or working on a project, or you reach for that saw, you might remember the phrase, “Measure twice, cut once,” and take a step back to double-check that what you are about to do … actually fits or corrects the issue at hand. You might find that your success rate indeed goes up!

Shameless plug!

And, be sure to check out my novel, Serpents Underfoot, on amazon.com!  It is getting rave reviews on both Amazon and Goodreads!  It must have something going for it. I am busy at work on the sequel. Feedback so far has been terrific and I think it is going to be great!