Tag Archives: Family

Adirondack Bear Tale #8: Campfire BBQ Chicken

Grandma Gilbert’s Campfire BBQ Chicken

Campfire BBQ ChickenIt was a nice cool Adirondack evening.  Therefore, Grandma Gilbert decided to make campfire BBQ chicken using the outside fireplace behind the camp. This way they could be outside to enjoy the cool evening air. There would also be less mess to clean up in the kitchen after dinner.

Grandpa started a wood fire in the cinder block fireplace and kept feeding it seasoned beech wood. Soon, there was a nice bed of red-hot coals. Grandma set the old cast iron skillet containing a little oil, some seasonings, and the chicken down on the steel grate Grandpa had set across the cinder blocks of the fireplace. In just a few minutes, the chicken was sizzling merrily away. It soon began to smell really good. While Grandma watched the chicken, Grandpa went into the camp to prepare the rest of dinner.

In the woods behind the camp,  a passing black bear lifted his nose into the air. His keen sense of smell had discovered the tantalizing aroma of cooking chicken, BBQ sauce, and wood smoke. As a result of his discovery, the bear changed his direction of travel, and started to follow the wonderful smell that drifted along on the evening breeze. Consequently, he soon found himself coming out of the woods … right behind Grandma Gilbert, who was busily tending to the chicken.

Grandpa Gilbert stepped out of the camp to check on how Grandma was doing with the chicken. He had been in the kitchen preparing corn-on-the-cob and a tossed salad to compliment the BBQ chicken.

“How’s the chicken coming, Marjorie?” he asked.

“Just fine Henry,” Grandma answered.

As Grandpa turned to go back into the camp, he noticed a movement out of the corner of his eye. Turning to see what it was, he saw the bear coming out of the woods and making its way toward the fireplace and Grandma.

“Marjorie!” he called. “There is a black bear coming up behind you, Come in the camp. Hurry!”

Grandma turned and saw the bear, and quickly made her way toward the porch. Then she stopped, and looked back.

“Come on, Marjorie. What are you doing?” Grandpa called. Grandma was headed back toward the fireplace and the chicken. “Never mind the chicken. Get in the camp!”

“Not without my chicken,” she replied. Still wearing the oven mitt on her hand, she ran back to the fireplace, arriving just seconds before the bear. Grabbing the skillet by the handle, she let out a with a loud, “Shoo!”  Then turning quickly, Grandma made a bee-line for the porch. In a second, she was up on the porch and in the camp. Grandpa promptly shut the door.

As a result, the BBQ chicken was safe. The bear, however, was a bit miffed and sniffed around on the porch for several minutes. Finally, the bear figured out that the great smelling campfire BBQ chicken was now beyond his reach. The bear reluctantly made his way back into the woods, continuing his search for his supper.

The campfire BBQ chicken, corn-on-the-cob, and tossed salad made a wonderful dinner.  In addition, the rest of the family got to enjoy hearing the tale of how Grandma rescued the chicken from the hungry black bear many times over the years.

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Don’t Bring Your Momma’s Tack Hammer!!

22-ounce wooden-handled framing hammer with mi...
22-ounce wooden-handled framing hammer with milled head and “straight” claw (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I was listening to the Hannity Show awhile back and Sean was interviewing some leader of the Occupy Wall Street Movement.  This angry young man had amassed over $200,000 in student loans.  He felt the government should pay for his school, his housing, his food, etc.,  He stated he was not against working but that he would not work for less than $80,000 per year starting salary (and ummm … that’s was with no job experience).  Is this the kind of entitlement-minded, narcissistic idiots our NEA controlled public school system is producing for us  today?  An “entitlement kiddie” with his head full of socialist ideals and unsustainable utopian theories, and absolutely no work ethic, drive to succeed, real life experience, wisdom, or common sense?  I am so glad I do not have young children in today’s public school system.  I guess they would have to be “Home Schooled!”

What I want to know is … where was this kid’s grandfather?  I remember the “pearls of wisdom” my grandfathers passed on to me that helped shape the man I am today.  They helped form my work ethic, my sense of working for and earning what I receive, and … how to treat other people. Both of my grandfather’s worked at Remington Arms in Ilion, New York.  They were hardworking, blue-collar, honest men who gave a day’s work for a day’s wage.  They saved their money, provided for their families, and turned out the terrific, hardworking youngsters who later became my parents.  They suffered, they learned, they loved, and they sacrificed … for their families and their country.  They also developed a lot of real wisdom as they earned their wrinkles and lost their gray hair during those years following WWII.  I still remember some of these “Pearls of Wisdom ” like:

  • Measure twice, cut once!
  • Always return a tool in better shape than it was in when you borrowed it.
  • Can’t never could do anything
  • I sawed it off twice and it’s still too short.
  • It’s not what you say, it’s what you do that matters
  • The only people who never make mistakes are the people who never do anything

Hallerin Hilton Hill had a caller this morning on his radio talk show who related a story about his father.  His father was a life-long carpenter.  The caller told us how, from the time he was thirteen, he spent his summers helping his father; getting yanked out of bed early, toting 2 x 4 ‘s, driving nails, etc.  He worked and earned his own money.  He even bought his own school clothes throughout his years in middle school and high school.  That work ethic is with him to this day.  I especially like the part of the story where he talked about his dad‘s method of interviewing possible new crew members.  Of course, they would always claim to have many years of experience framing houses, building decks, etc.  His dad would shrug that off and simply ask to see the guy’s hammer.  I guess it was pretty obvious by looking at the guy’s hammer what kind of experience he had?  The caller told how once, his dad even turned and threw the guys hammer into the river and said something like, “Boy, don’t ever bring your mamma’s tack hammer to a carpenter’s job interview!”   I guess the guy probably didn’t get the job.

We need parents in this country who take the time to teach their kids real values, life skills, and common sense; to teach them how to get up when they fall down.  We need our grandfather’s wisdom to be passed down again.  Our country needs Americans who believe in hard work, in earning what you get, who have the gumption to get back up if they get knocked down, and who love their country!  We already have more than enough parasites who hope to fundamentally transform our country so they can simply lay back and suckle at the government’s teat … or folks who show up with their momma’s tack hammer and expect $80,000 a year!