Tag Archives: DC Gilbert

Twitter Marketing for Aspiring Authors

Self-published indie authors are always looking for new ways to market themselves and their books. There are several social media tools available for this purpose. Instagram is one such tool that I covered in an earlier post. Twitter is another.

Can you use Twitter to market your book(s)?

Like with Instagram, the short answer is … yes. You certainly can. However, again like Instagram, you do have to understand a few key things going in to it.

Unlike Instagram, with Twitter, your post can link directly to your book’s page on Amazon.com or any other web page you choose. You will probably still not generate a lot of sales tweeting away on Twitter, but you will generate some. However, like Instagram, Twitter is a valuable tool for establishing yourself as an author and networking with other indie authors, publishers, or editors … sharing ideas, experiences, and writing tips as well as promoting your book in those same circles.

While Instagram is more visual, Twitter is about crafting a clever message in 280 characters. You can include images (and I usually do) but the real trick here is to try to get the reader to click the link in the tweet. Below are a few sample Tweets I created and sent out into the Twit-O-Sphere!

Note the hashtags …

twitter

Again, it is about putting your name and your work in front of a growing audience in a way that builds your brand recognition and establishes you as an author to be remembered. And, like I stated earlier, you may actually even sell a few books.

twitter

Other aspects to consider on Twitter

  • Hashtags – Use hashtags before relevant keywords in your tweet to categorize tweets and help them show up in Twitter searches. Clicking or tapping on a hash-tagged word in any tweet displays other Tweets that include that hashtagHashtags can be included anywhere in a Tweet. Examples: #SerpentsUnderfoot #AdirondackBearTales #writingcommunity #amwriting
  • Tags – You can also tag a specific Twitter handle to ensure that user gets the Tweet in their feed. Examples: @darrencgilbert @AdirondackAlmanac.

    This is very basic. There are some other, trickier aspects to using the @ sign in a Tweet. For more information on using the @ symbol in Tweets, just click this link here!

Twitter also has some strong and welcoming communities for writers and readers. These folks are always willing to share ideas, critiques, etc. There are groups that run little writing contests based on “prompt words” that can help you improve your writing skills … especially since you only have 280 characters!

So, jump in and get started! Join the writing community, try your hand at a few word prompts, and mostly … have fun.

One last thought …

Don’t get caught up in the race for followers. You will have offers to grow your following by the thousands … for a fee of course. Let your following grow naturally. It is far better to have 300 followers that are really interested in you and your work, than to have 3000 followers you paid for and who don’t give a rat’s ass about what you are doing.

For other interesting posts on a variety of topics, click here!

Race to Amazing, by Krista S. Moore

Get in the Race to Amazing

race to successI received an advance copy of Krista S. Moore’s new book, Race to Amazing. I found her ideas on coaching and professional and personal success refreshing and interesting, And, perhaps even more importantly, actionable!

Sales is an adapt or fail kind of business. To be successful as a leader in sales, you must consistently bring your “A Game.” You are in a race! There is a finish line. Waiting at that finish line is professional and personal success. Krista S. Moore has successfully run that race, and now wants to share her knowledge and experience with you  as a professional and personal success coach..

Success can have its pitfalls. One of the adages Krista S. Moore learned early on is that when you feel like you have your business all figured out and you think you have all the answers, you’re probably at the beginning of  a downward slide. She writes that at this point you, if you are not careful, you will lose focus, stagnate, become complacent and unproductive. And sadly, too often for many of us, our personal success is tied to our professional success. It is indeed a dangerous place to be in both business and personal life.

Get in the race!

There is good news! You can begin a process of self-discovery that reignites your drive to professional greatness. And, with a well-planned course of action, you may find that you achieve success in both your professional and personal goals together. I was especially intrigued by one particular technique Krista uses to help her clients rediscover their passion and get them back in the race.

What was your dream when you were 10-years-old?

Krista explored this concept in her earlier book, Your 10-Year-Old Self. In this first book, Krista explores the powerful process of going backwards to help you move yourself forward. The idea is to rediscover your authentic self, who you are at your core; before peer pressure and social influences caused you to lose sight of who you are. The idea is to rediscover your passion, dreams, and desires, so you can “play forward” with real purpose and meaning in your life. According to Krista Moore, you need to let you 10-year old self shine through!

Race to Amazing

In her soon-to-be-released book, Race to Amazing, Krista S. Moore goes still further in her efforts to help you win your personal race to amazing. This second book will guide you as you work to develop that well-planned course of action mentioned earlier. Whatever your goals are, this book can help you achieve them. To reach your successful sales leader goals, you must first get in the race; whether this race is against a competitor, to a title, a new position, or even against the fears and doubts that hold you back. And, you must be in the race to win. Krista S. Moore will be there to guide you as you work your way through her unique, successful, and proven approach to individual development.

Race to Amazing will help you to:

• Gain clarity on what exactly your vision of success is, and what obstacles lay in your path.
• Develop an open and honest relationship with yourself through personal reflection and self-discovery.
• Discover who you are and who you really from life.
• Learn to “own it” and look squarely are where you are today, how you got there, and what you need to do to move forward.
• “Go deeper” in your self-discovery process to find your real purpose, meaning, and passion, and how you can improve your own life by serving others.
• “Play big” from your positions of strength and to take calculated risks that achieve results.

Race to Amazing contains all the tools you need succeed in your exciting new journey of self-discovery and your race to the top. Best of all, you will not be alone while running this race. Included within the pages of this soon-to-be-released book are links to additional tools and resources, and links to develop new friends and fans. You will develop a support network spurring you on to continued growth, inspiration, and motivation.

Race to Amazing is a book that can help you achieve a life of personal greatness.

Success in Life Rules: Post by Cristian Mihai

Rules for Success in Life

success in lifeThere is a lot of “success in life” or self-improvement information floating around out there; some of it great, some of it good, and some of it not so good. Many people are trying to succeed at their dreams. If you can make your hobby your occupation, that is indeed one form of success.

Rules for Success by Earl Nightingale

Cristian Mihai’s post on Earl Nightingale’s 12 rules made me think. You might want to check it out.

via How Earl Nightingale’s 12 Rules Can Help You Succeed In Life

Reflect On Where You Are… And Want To Be!

Reading this post made me take a good look at the things I am doing to succeed in my goal to be a successful author. While it would be hard to put all 12 rules into play at one time, we can certainly begin working on one and then expand from there over time. I know I am going to be re-evaluating some of the things I have been doing in the light of Earl Nightingale’s 12 Rules.

So, I would just like to thank Cristian Mihai for sharing this post with his readers. It is one of the more helpful blog posts I have read in a long time, at least as far as reaching my goals are concerned.

Vietnam Veteran’s Day in Raleigh, NC

Vietnam Veteran’s Day Weekend!

Vietnam Veteran'sI went to the Vietnam Veteran’s Day Weekend held in  Raleigh. It was sponsored by the North Carolina Museum of History & The North Carolina Vietnam Veterans, Inc. This turned out to be a very moving day. First, I will say it was a real honor to talk to several of these veterans. I enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1979, so the Vietnam War had been over for 4 years. However, several of the drill instructors I had in Basic and AIT were Vietnam Veterans home from the war. As a young trainee, I was in awe of these veteran warriors.

Talking to Vietnam Veterans

Vietnam Veteran'sFrank Lazarro was there with a display. Frank is a Marine Corps veteran who wrote a poem about PTSD that I posted on this blog some time ago. I also talked to a veteran who was talking to visitors about the Huey chopper. Kids and adults were having a great time climbing on the chopper and sitting in the pilot’s seat. It brought back memories of my experiences flying over the jungles in Panama when I was with the 1/501st Air Assault. I also talked to a veteran who had published a book and we exchanged some writer’s “tips.”

One Vietnam Veteran’s Dioramas

Vietnam veteran'sI found myself admiring several dioramas depicting scenes from the Vietnam War. A man came up and said if I had any questions about them, he would be happy to answer them. His name was Ron Harris. He had built the dioramas. They were all good, but the one depicting the tunnel complex at Chu Chi really intrigued me. The  tunnel system built and utilized by the North Vietnamese and their Viet Cong allies is simply amazing. Ron stated he had been back to Vietnam since the war, and the tunnels at Chu Chi have been converted to a major tourist attraction, albeit enlarged a bit to fit the frames of western tourists.

Etchings in Stone

We started talking about his dioramas and other topics and I mentioned my novel, Serpents Underfoot. I guess because its narrative begins in the jungles of Vietnam. Ron was interested in my writing and said he would have to get the Kindle version of my novel. I hope he enjoys it.

Ron then told me that the play, Etchings in Stone, they were showing a filmed presentation of in the auditorium was written by him. I decided I needed to see it. So, after viewing a few more displays, I went into the auditorium to watch the film. It was, simply put, amazing.

It opened with the playing of Taps. Then the audience finds themselves having the unique perspective of somehow being inside the black wall of the Vietnam War Memorial and listening to the thoughts and words of visitors to the memorial. An officer who lost men, a buddy, a girl friend, a Gold Star Mother, a Gold Star Father, the wife of an MIA, an Amerasian girl, an Antiwar Protester, and others. You participate in their emotional healing, their asking for forgiveness, their searching for answers, and longing for lost family members. Several of the scenes brought tears to my eyes.  The heart-touching scenes are interspersed with photos from the Vietnam War and very moving music, mostly by Country-style artists … and very well done.

My Father

Vietnam veteran'sThe scene that really got to me the most involved an Amerasian orphan. She approaches to the wall and talks of her birth parents. Her mother is a Vietnamese woman she has never met and who gave her up for adoption. Her father was an American soldier in Vietnam who was killed in action before he could marry her mother and take her back to America. The girl came to American, adopted by loving American family who has taken her into their hearts and home, and given her everything they could. She loves them dearly, but still sometimes wonders about her birth parents.

Now older, she goes back to Vietnam to try to locate her mother and perhaps find out who her father was. She manages to find an aunt, only to learn that her mother died in the 1980s.  Her aunt tells her that her mother would never talk about the American GI who was her father. The young woman returns to America and next seeks the help of other Vietnam veterans to try to determine who her birth father was. But, there is simply not enough information.

So finally, the young woman comes to the Wall to choose a name to be “the name” of her birth father. However, she is overwhelmed. There are over 50,000 names on the Wall. How can she choose one? She decides to choose them all! She will come back to visit them often and when she does, if anyone asks her if she knows someone whose name is on the wall, she will simply answer yes, “My father.” It was all I could do to keep from crying.

On the way out, I stopped to tell Ron Harris how much that play had affected me and how much I enjoyed it. It was really quite an amazing day.

 

 

Writer’s Block … What do you do about it?

How to Overcome Writer’s Block

writer's blockWriter’s block is experienced by every writer at some point. If you are a writer, it is fairly inevitable. You stare at the your display, fingers poised over the keyboard, but nothing comes. It is like you have lost the ability to produce any new work, or at the very least, you are experiencing a massive creative slowdown. You are not alone in this. Some great writers, including F. Scott Fitzgerald (The Great Gatsby), Herman Melville (Moby Dick), and Joseph Mitchell (The New Yorker),  have suffered from this affliction. So have cartoonist Charles M.Schultz, composer Sergei Rachmaninoff, and songwriter Adele.

Common Causes of Writer’s Block

Conflicted feelings are often what causes writer’s block. You know how it goes … the writing needs to be perfect … there is a deadline looming … we want the project completed on time. We know what we know about our subject matter but we don’t know what our readers will know about it. We know how the story should unfold, but we don’t have all the research or facts we need. Our creative mind is stuck in neutral. And, no matter what we try, it will not get back in gear.

Some Common Suggestions to Overcome Writer’s Block

There are several several popular tips for overcoming writer’s block. I included a few below. But, to be honest, I have not had much luck with any of these.

  • Step away:  Do something else creative like maybe working on your website, painting, playing an instrument. Exercise the creative side of your brain and you should soon be back into the groove of writing.
  • Move:  Dance, ride a bike, do yoga, practice Tai Chi, or swim. Activities such as these will relax your mind and let the creative process flow again,
  • Eliminate Distractions:  Turn off your phone, unplug from the internet. Straighten up your work area. Ask you friends to honor your time devoted to writing. Writing takes solitude.

What I Have Found to Work Best

Sometime ago I was at a North Carolina Writer’s Network writer’s conference at UNC Greensboro,  In one of the sessions I attended, the presenter discussed this very problem.  He explained that often, writer’s block is caused when your brain is unhappy with the direction your narrative has taken. He suggested looking carefully at where your narrative started down its current path … and deleting everything from that point forward.  Yes … it certainly seems a bit drastic, but I  used this technique twice while writing Serpents Underfoot. And, it worked very well. In addition, you can also tailor this technique to be chapter specific. This technique does not necessarily need to be applied to the entire project. If you write like I do, you may do some jumping around.

Let me know if you try it and it works for you!

Skadoosh! Another ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Review!

That’s right, I wrote Skadoosh! I am celebrating another Five Star Review for Serpents Underfoot!

What is skadoosh, you may ask? It’s a secret technique from the movie, Kung Fu Panda.  The “word” kind of stuck in my brain. I use it as an exclamation of thankful appreciation, kind of like ‘Bingo” or “Yippee.” My novel, Serpents Underfoot, has just scored another Five Star Review on Amazon.com!  So yes, I could have written “yippee,” but “skadoosh” just sounds so much cooler!

Thank you, Kathleen Palazzolo, for your great review and kind words. This makes a total of nine … not that I am keeping count or anything! Reviews like this really make it all worthwhile and I really appreciate the feedback.

I am hard at work on the sequel, Montagnard.  Of course, my goal is to make it even better than Serpents Underfoot.  I did learn a good deal writing the first novel, so this should turn out to be the case. Soon, I will be posting some teasers and sample chapters on my website.

It is Friday, so I hope everyone has a bodacious weekend ahead of them!

P.S. Please remember to occasionally check back here for updates … and, I do have an email subscription form! I promise not to spam anyone, but I will announce things like Advance Review Copies if anyone is interested in getting one … of course, that will be a bit off yet!

What does shape the story: Fact, Fantasy or Fiction!

What helps shape the story?

shape the story
Sensei Sherman Harrill

What does shape the story? Several people with whom I have spoken after they read my novel, Serpents Underfoot, have asked me if there are some of my life experiences woven into the story. What life experiences helped shape the story? And I answer, of course, there are.

I have about 35 years of martial arts experience as a student, instructor, and dojo owner. That experience plays a crucial role in Curtis’ and especially JD’s interest and development in the martial arts, and for JD, specifically in Isshin-ryu Karate. I based Sensei Tokumura’s character on my last karate sensei, Sherman Harrill, who helped me to understand what real karate is all about. Those who have trained with Sensei know what I mean. It was a real honor to be that man’s student.

An Army of One?

shape the story
Trainee Darren Gilbert

While it also helped shape the story, the military stuff is a bit more complicated. Even as a young child, I wanted to be in the military. The backyard was my battlefield where my brother and I had legions of little green army men with jeeps, trucks, tanks, field artillery, etc., all under our command. We had trenches and foxholes. It was quite a battlefield. If you asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up, I’d reply “I want to be an army!” I still remember my parents laughing and telling me that one man cannot be an army, but you can indeed be a soldier.

Maybe that is why the recruiting slogan adopted in 2001, an “Army of One” was so short lived and was replaced by “Army Strong” in 2006. Perhaps Army officials either talked to my parents, or they decided “Army of One” was a bit contrary to the idea of teamwork, an approach the military relies so heavily upon.

I did not just want to join the U.S. Army … I wanted to be an Army Ranger. And later, maybe even get into the Special Forces. I still remember that day, when I was perhaps 14 or 15-years-old, being so impressed when a Ranger team put on a demonstration of their skills at a park in North Adams, Massachusetts. That was what I wanted to be! The problem was I stuttered, and in my younger years, it was quite pronounced. However, this did not change my dreams of joining the military.

There was just one problem!

shape the story
U.S. Army Ranger

My stuttering seemed to lessen at least in comparison to my earlier school days. Either that or I slowly became better at concealing my stuttering depending on the circumstances. So, in July of 1979, I went down to the recruiting station in Oak Ridge, Tennessee and I enlisted in the U.S. Army. I had just blown the ASVAB right out of the water, so I could pick whatever MOS (job) I wanted. Looking back on it now, I  should have probably chosen some good technical skill (maybe “in-flight missile repair technician”), but I wanted Ranger School; so that meant picking 11Bravo (Infantry) as my MOS. I had planned on an initial tour of three years, but I ended up signing a contract for four years (they offered me a $4,000 cash enlistment bonus upon completion of training if I enlisted for a four year period instead of 3 years).

On my way!

According to my contract, I was going to Basic Training at Ft. Knox, Advanced Infantry Training at Ft. Benning, and then directly to Ranger School which, if I remember correctly, was also at Ft. Benning. I guess it was because of the high ASVAB scores that I was able to lock this in. I took the oath, and the recruiter gave me a ride home to get a toothbrush and say goodbye to my parents,  and we headed off to Ft. Knox, Kentucky that same afternoon. The recruiter who’d signed me up was going back to Ft. Knox, so he kindly offered to give me a ride. Several hours later, dropped me off at the induction center. Amazingly, I had not stuttered once this whole time, even when taking the oath. It was like a dream come true. I was going to be a U.S. Army Ranger.

Basic Training

Basic training began. And, yes it was pretty freaking tough. But, I loved it! Unfortunately, much to my dismay, some of the drill instructors discovered I stuttered. For me, it was virtually impossible not to stutter when they jumped dead in my shit; they were experts at it. I knew it was only part of the mind game they played to see who could take the stress and who would crack. If you could not handle their crap, you certainly had no business on the battlefield. I will say that, once they figured out what was going on, they did not belittle me for it. They were, however naturally concerned about me screwing up their Army. But, I was also doing very well with the training; physical training, shooting ranges, running, hand-to-hand combat, grenade ranges, mud, running,  probing for mines, weapons cleaning and assembly, rain, running, heat, road marches, more running … I was eating that stuff up!

Just one catch!

shape the story
Infantry Qualification Test Maximum Score

Then one afternoon, I got called into the Company Commander’s office. I was pretty nervous about that, wondering what the heck I had done. Once I reported, I was ordered to stand at ease. The Company Commander was a young Army captain not much older than me. The Captain told me that the U.S. Army appreciated my volunteering, my efforts, and ambition, etc. He went on to say that by all the reports he had, I was performing outstandingly in my training. However, in spite of that, the U.S. Army could not send me to ranger school. The Captain explained that my stuttering presented too much of a risk, especially with the cost of the training provided during ranger school. I was severely bummed out! But, deep down inside, I could see their point … and I hated it. The Captain went on to explain to me that, because they could not honor the contract they signed with me, I could get out of the Army honorably if I chose to.

My choice was clear!

I did not even have to think about it. For me, that was not an option. I asked if I could remain in the infantry if I stayed. The Captain replied that I certainly could. So, I stated that I did not want out. I would continue my training. The Captain nodded, saying that he had expected no less, and then dismissed me. I completed Basic Training achieving a high score on my end of cycle test, which I felt was quite an accomplishment.  I boarded a bus for the Infantry School at Ft Benning, Georgia.

One of my best memories of Ft. Benning occurred on the rifle range. We were conducting rapid-fire exercises with our M-16 rifles, and I was knocking them down. Drill Sergeant Winters stopped pacing and stood behind me for a few minutes, watching. When the range officer called for a cease-fire, I stopped and cleared my weapon. Drill Sergeant Winters looked down at me and stated, “That is some mighty fine shooting, son! Wherever you end up, they will be glad to have you.” I finished AIT by earning the maximum possible score on the Infantry Qualification Test.

Breakfast at Denny’s!

One other great memory. Another soldier and I were eating breakfast at a Denny’s in Columbus, Georgia. We were on our first weekend pass. After we had eaten, we would catch a cab back to the base. We were sitting there in our khaki uniforms when an older woman stopped by our table and started talking to us. We had no idea who she was. She was telling us how good it was to see two such outstanding young men in uniform and told us she was going to buy us breakfast, We both said thank you, but that it was not necessary. She would not argue. The woman then asked us if we knew who she was. We both replied that we did not. She told us she was Lillian Carter, the President’s mother. We were surprised, but finally noticed the men in suits standing around us. Probably Secret Service agents! The President’s mother took care of our check and then wishing us well, left with her escort. That was simply amazing!

Fun, Travel, and Adventure!

shape the story
2/22 Inf, Battalion Executive Officer’s Driver

So, I served my four years in the U.S. Army Infantry. I traveled the world, saw different cultures, and did some pretty exciting things. In Germany,  I was stationed at Wiesbaden Air Base with the 2/22 Infantry. Shortly after arriving, I was asked to report to the Battalion Executive Officer. My first thought was, Dang! Here I go again! I reported to the XO as ordered. He had been looking at my file and needed a driver. I took the job. I served as the Battalion Executive Officer’s driver for almost two years and spent a great deal of time patrolling our Battalion’s area of operations near the Fulda Gap. Our job was to slow the Russians down if they ever came across the border.

Finishing my two years in Germany, I got orders to Ft. Polk, Louisianna. The last place in the world I wanted to go was Ft. Polk, Louisianna! So, I went to the CO and asked how to get out of having to go there. He replied that I just needed to volunteer to go someplace else nobody else wanted to go. I asked him where. He said Alaska or South  Korea. I chose South Korea.

The DMZ

During my year in South Korea, with the 1/17 Infantry, I did a 90-day tour on the DMZ between North and South Korea. That was pretty exciting stuff,  a real mission. Real guns, real grenades,  real bullets, and a real enemy you could see from the observation post. And, sometimes … even stumble on while patrolling the DMZ itself.

I enjoyed the Asian culture and immersed myself in it. This cultural appreciation certainly shaped the story. I got involved with the local Amerasian orphanage and helped put a new roof on their building and also helped feed the kids Thanksgiving dinner. My year was up way too fast!

Air Assault!

shape the story
Certified Jungle Expert

When I got to my last duty station, I was assigned to the 1/501st Air Assault at Ft. Campbell, Kentucky.  We later deployed to Panama, flying down on a C-130. We were cruising along at about 30,000 ft, sitting in slippery, canvas bench seats that ran lengthwise on the plane. As we approached Panama, a light turned on, and suddenly the plane stood on its nose and dove. We all slid sideways toward the front of the aircraft. It leveled out at about 400 ft if I remember correctly, and the back ramp opened. A group of men we never even knew were there (they were sitting behind our stacked gear) stood up and ran off the lowered ramp, jumping out into the night sky. When the ramp closed, the C-130 stood on its tail and climbed back to cruising altitude. We all slid back toward the rear of the plane. We were all surprised. I would never have thought an aircraft that big could fly like that. I’d always figured the group of men was a team of Army Rangers on a training exercise, but who knows?

Invasion of Panama?

This action all took place shortly before we took out General Manuel Noreiga, and I always figured we were sent there as a show of force … hoping to calm things down. I am not so sure that worked. However we could not just sit on our collective butts, so while there at Ft. Sherman, we completed the Jungle Warfare School.  My squad broke some battalion record for completing the Jungle Obstacle Course. We got a steak and lobster dinner, compliments of the Battalion Commander, for that accomplishment.

When it came time to reenlist, I did give that some very serious consideration. However, the paths I really wanted to take were essentially closed to me because of my speech impediment. So, I decided to seek my fortune elsewhere. I suppose you could say that the military adventures of Curtis Cordell and his son, JD Cordell are fantasies … depictions of the kinds of adventures I would like to have had if things had worked out differently.

All of these experiences did combine to help shape the story.